Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/tc-2016-269
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
09 Dec 2016
Review status
A revision of this discussion paper was accepted for the journal The Cryosphere (TC) and is expected to appear here in due course.
A new approach to estimate ice dynamic rates using satellite observations in East Antarctica
Bianca Kallenberg1, Paul Tregoning1, Janosch F. Hoffmann2, Rhys Hawkins1, Anthony Purcell1, and S├ębastien Allgeyer1 1Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia
2College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
Abstract. Mass balance changes of the Antarctic ice sheet are of significant interest due to its sensitivity to climatic changes and its contribution to changes in global sea level. While regional climate models successfully estimate mass input due to snowfall, it remains difficult to estimate the amount of mass loss due to ice dynamic processes. It's often been assumed that changes in ice dynamic rates only need to be considered when assessing long term ice sheet mass balance; however, two decades of satellite altimetry observations reveal that the Antarctic ice sheet changes unexpectedly and much more dynamically than previously expected. Despite available estimates on ice dynamic rates obtained from radar altimetry, information about changes in ice dynamic rates are still limited, especially in East Antarctica. Without understanding ice dynamic rates it is not possible to properly assess changes in ice sheet mass balance, surface elevation or to develop ice sheet models. In this study we investigate the possibility of estimating ice dynamic rates by removing modelled rates of surface mass balance, firn compaction and bedrock uplift from satellite altimetry and gravity observations. With similar rates of ice discharge acquired from two different satellite missions we show that it is possible to obtain an approximation of ice dynamic rates by combining altimetry and gravity observations. Thus, surface elevation changes due to surface mass balance, firn compaction and ice dynamic rates can be modelled and correlate with observed elevation changes from satellite altimetry.

Citation: Kallenberg, B., Tregoning, P., Hoffmann, J. F., Hawkins, R., Purcell, A., and Allgeyer, S.: A new approach to estimate ice dynamic rates using satellite observations in East Antarctica, The Cryosphere Discuss., doi:10.5194/tc-2016-269, in review, 2016.
Bianca Kallenberg et al.
Bianca Kallenberg et al.
Bianca Kallenberg et al.

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