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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2017-51
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2017-51
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Submitted as: brief communication 25 Apr 2017

Submitted as: brief communication | 25 Apr 2017

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal The Cryosphere (TC). The revised manuscript was not accepted.

Brief communication: Changing mid-twentieth century Antarctic sea ice variability linked to tropical forcing

Chris S.~M. Turney1,2, Andrew Klekociuk3,4, Christopher J. Fogwill1,2, Violette Zunz5, Hugues Goosse6, Claire L. Parkinson7, Gilbert Compo8,9, Matthew Lazzara10,11, Linda Keller10, Rob Allan12, Jonathan G. Palmer1,2, Graeme Clark13, and Ezequiel Marzinelli13,14,15 Chris S.~M. Turney et al.
  • 1Climate Change Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australia
  • 2Palaeontology, Geobiology and Earth Archives Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australia
  • 3Australian Antarctic Division, 203 Channel Highway, Kingston 7050, Tasmania, Australia
  • 4Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 80, Hobart, Tasmania 7001
  • 5Earth System Science and Departement Geografie, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Belgium
  • 6Université catholique de Louvain, Earth and Life Institute, Georges Lemaître Centre for Earth and Climate Research, Place Pasteur, 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
  • 7Cryospheric Sciences Laboratory/Code 615, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA
  • 8Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
  • 9Physical Sciences Division, Earth System Research Laboratory, NOAA, Boulder, CO 80305, USA
  • 10Meteorologist at the Antarctic Meteorological Research Center, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, USA
  • 11Department of Physical Sciences, School of Arts and Sciences, Madison Area Technical College, Madison, WI, USA
  • 12Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter, UK
  • 13Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australia
  • 14Sydney Institute of Marine Science, Chowder Bay Road, Mosman NSW 2088, Australia
  • 15Centre for Bio-Innovation Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australia

Abstract. Satellite observations demonstrate Antarctic sea ice extent increased between late-1978 and 2015, with significant spatial and seasonal variability. Late spring retreat off George V Land is a major component of the observed increase, but the paucity of proxy records makes interpretation of trends (and impacts) challenging. Here Earth-system modelling and reanalysis demonstrate tropical Pacific warming can trigger an atmospheric Rossby wave response during the austral spring, delaying sea-ice retreat off George V Land. Our results provide new insights into the spatial and temporal role low latitudes play in Antarctic sea-ice production, drift and ocean circulation on decadal to centennial timescales.

Chris S.~M. Turney et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Chris S.~M. Turney et al.
Chris S.~M. Turney et al.
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Short summary
We demonstrate that a mid-twentieth century decrease in geopotential height in the southwest Pacific marks a Rossby wave response to equatorial Pacific warming, leading to enhanced easterly airflow off George V Land. Our results suggest that in contrast to ozone hole-driven changes in the Amundsen Sea, the 1979–2015 increase in sea ice extent off George V Land may be in response to reduced northward Ekman drift and enhanced (near-coast) production as a consequence of low latitude forcing.
We demonstrate that a mid-twentieth century decrease in geopotential height in the southwest...
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