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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-224
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-224
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 14 Nov 2018

Research article | 14 Nov 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal The Cryosphere (TC).

Attenuation of Sound in Glacier Ice from 2 kHz to 35 kHz

Alexander Meyer, Dmitry Eliseev, Dirk Heinen, Peter Linder, Franziska Scholz, Lars Steffen Weinstock, Christopher Wiebusch, and Simon Zierke Alexander Meyer et al.
  • III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen University, Otto Blumenthal Str., 52074 Aachen, Germany

Abstract. The acoustic damping of sound waves in natural glaciers is a largely unexplored physical property that has relevance for various applications. We present measurements of the attenuation of sound in ice with a dedicated measurement setup in situ on the Italian glacier Langenferner. The tested frequency ranges from 2kHz to 35kHz and probed distances between 5 meter and 90 meter. The attenuation length has been determined by two different methods and detailed investigations of systematic uncertainties. The attenuation length decreases slowly with increasing frequencies. Observed values range between 13 meter for low frequencies and 5 meter for high frequencies.The here presented results strongly improve in accuracy with respect to previous measurements. However, quantitatively the found attenuation is remarkably similar to observations at very different locations.

Alexander Meyer et al.
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Alexander Meyer et al.
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Short summary
The acoustic damping in natural glaciers is a largely unexplored physical property that has relevance for various applications particularly for the exploration of glaciers with probes. We present measurements of the attenuation of sound in situ on the Italian glacier Langenferner. The tested frequency ranges from 2 kHz to 35 kHz. The attenuation length ranges between 13meter for low frequencies and 5 meter for high frequency.
The acoustic damping in natural glaciers is a largely unexplored physical property that has...
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