Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.524 IF 4.524
  • IF 5-year value: 5.558 IF 5-year 5.558
  • CiteScore value: 4.84 CiteScore 4.84
  • SNIP value: 1.425 SNIP 1.425
  • SJR value: 3.034 SJR 3.034
  • IPP value: 4.65 IPP 4.65
  • h5-index value: 52 h5-index 52
  • Scimago H index value: 55 Scimago H index 55
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-242
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-242
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 07 Dec 2018

Research article | 07 Dec 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal The Cryosphere (TC).

Instantaneous sea ice drift speed from TanDEM-X interferometry

Dyre Oliver Dammann1, Leif E. B. Eriksson1, Joshua M. Jones2, Andrew R. Mahoney2,3, Roland Romeiser4, Franz J. Meyer2, Hajo Eicken3,5, and Yasushi Fukamachi3,6,7 Dyre Oliver Dammann et al.
  • 1Department of Space, Earth, and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
  • 2Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA
  • 3Global Station for Arctic Research, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
  • 4Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA
  • 5International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks AK, USA
  • 6Arctic Research Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
  • 7Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan

Abstract. The drift of sea ice is an important geophysical process with widespread implications for the ocean energy budget, ecosystems, and marine operations. Drifting sea ice can threaten navigation routes and present a hazard for ocean vessels and maritime installations. Here, we evaluate single-pass synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) as a tool to assess ice drift for different uses. Initial validation shows that TanDEM-X phase-derived drift speed corresponds well with drift products from a ground-based radar at Utqiaġvik, Alaska. Joint analysis of TanDEM-X and Sentinel-1 data covering the Fram Strait demonstrates that InSAR can help quantify the opening/closing rate of leads. In contrast to standard SAR-based drift algorithms deriving averaged drift velocities, single-pass InSAR enables an instantaneous assessment with advantages in the context of ice management and transportation. By evaluating sea ice drift through the Vilkitsky Strait, Russia, we identified short-lived transient convergence patterns. We conclude that InSAR enables the identification of potentially important short-lived dynamic processes otherwise difficult to observe with possible implication for engineering and sea ice modeling.

Dyre Oliver Dammann et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 01 Feb 2019)
Status: open (until 01 Feb 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Dyre Oliver Dammann et al.
Dyre Oliver Dammann et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 252 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
194 55 3 252 1 0
  • HTML: 194
  • PDF: 55
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 252
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 07 Dec 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 07 Dec 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 141 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 141 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 17 Jan 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
We evaluate single-pass synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) as a tool to assess sea ice drift with applications within ice management and navigation. Initial validation shows that TanDEM-X phase-derived drift speed corresponds well with ground-based radar derived drift. InSAR further enables the identification of potentially important short-lived dynamic processes otherwise difficult to observe with possible implication for engineering and sea ice modeling.
We evaluate single-pass synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) as a tool to assess sea...
Citation
Share