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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-290
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-290
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 21 Jan 2019

Research article | 21 Jan 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal The Cryosphere (TC).

On the multi-fractal scaling properties of sea ice deformation

Pierre Rampal1, Véronique Dansereau1, Einar Olason1, Sylvain Bouillon3, Timothy Williams1, and Abdoulaye Samaké2 Pierre Rampal et al.
  • 1Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway
  • 2Université de Bamako, Bamako, Mali
  • 3Numéca, Louvain La Neuve, Belgium

Abstract. In this paper, we evaluate the neXtSIM sea ice model with respect to the observed scaling invariance properties of sea ice deformation in the spatial and temporal domains. Using an Arctic set-up with realistic initial conditions, state-of-the-art atmospheric reanalysis forcing and geostrophic currents retrieved from satellite data, we show that the model is able to reproduce the observed properties of these scaling in both the spatial and temporal do- mains over a wide range of scales and, for the first time, their multi-fractality. The variability of these properties during the winter season are also captured by the model. We also show that the simulated scaling exhibit a space-time coupling, a suggested property of brittle deformation at geophysical scales. The ability to reproduce the multi-fractality of these scaling is crucial in the context of downscaling model simulation outputs to infer sea ice variables at the sub-grid scale, and also has implication in modeling the statistical properties of deformation-related quantities such as lead fractions, and heat and salt fluxes.

Pierre Rampal et al.
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Pierre Rampal et al.
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Latest update: 18 Apr 2019
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Short summary
In this article, we look at how the Arctic sea ice cover, as a solid body, behaves on different temporal and spatial scales.We show that the numerical model neXtSIM that uses a new approach to simulate the mechanics of sea ice is reproducing the characteristics of how sea ice deforms as observed by satellite.We discuss the importance of this model performance in the context of simulating climate processes taking place in polar regions,like the exchange of energy between the ocean and atmosphere.
In this article, we look at how the Arctic sea ice cover, as a solid body, behaves on different...
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