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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2019-192
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2019-192
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 26 Aug 2019

Submitted as: research article | 26 Aug 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal The Cryosphere (TC).

Multidecadal Arctic sea ice thickness and volume derived from ice age

Yinghui Liu1, Jeffrey R. Key1, Xuanji Wang2, and Mark Tschudi3 Yinghui Liu et al.
  • 1Center for Satellite Applications and Research, NOAA/NESDIS, Madison, Wisconsin
  • 2Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
  • 3Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

Abstract. Arctic sea ice is a key component of the Arctic climate system, which in turn impacts global climate. Ice concentration, thickness, and volume are among the most important Arctic sea ice parameters. This study presents a new record of Arctic sea ice thickness and volume from 1984 to 2018 based on an existing satellite-derived ice age product. The relationship between ice age and ice thickness is first established for every month based on collocated ice age and ice thickness from submarine sonar data (1984–2000), the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat, 2003–2008), and an empirical ice growth model. Based on this relationship, ice thickness is derived for the entire time period from the weekly ice age product, and the Arctic monthly sea ice volume is then calculated. The ice age-based thickness and volume show good agreement in terms of bias and root mean square error with submarine, ICESat, and CryoSat-2 ice thickness, as well as ICESat and CryoSat-2 ice volume, in February/March and October/November. Sea ice volume exhibits a decreasing trend of −411 km3/year from 1984 to 2018, stronger than the trends from other datasets. Of the factors affecting volume, changes in sea ice thickness from November to May contribute at least 80 %, decreasing to around 50 % in August and September. Changes in sea ice area contribute less than 30 % in all months.

Yinghui Liu et al.
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Yinghui Liu et al.
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Latest update: 14 Nov 2019
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Short summary
This study provide a consistent and accurate multidecadal product of ice thickness and ice volume based on ice age. Sea ice volume trends from this data set are stronger than the trends from other datasets. Changes in sea ice thickness contribute more to the overall sea ice volume trends than the contributions of changes in sea ice area in all months.
This study provide a consistent and accurate multidecadal product of ice thickness and ice...
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