Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.790 IF 4.790
  • IF 5-year value: 5.921 IF 5-year
    5.921
  • CiteScore value: 5.27 CiteScore
    5.27
  • SNIP value: 1.551 SNIP 1.551
  • IPP value: 5.08 IPP 5.08
  • SJR value: 3.016 SJR 3.016
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 63 Scimago H
    index 63
  • h5-index value: 51 h5-index 51
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2019-315
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2019-315
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: brief communication 21 Jan 2020

Submitted as: brief communication | 21 Jan 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

Brief communication: Time step dependence (and fixes) in Stokes simulations of calving ice shelves

Brandon Berg1,2 and Jeremy Bassis2 Brandon Berg and Jeremy Bassis
  • 1Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
  • 2Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Abstract. The buoyancy boundary condition applied to floating portions of ice sheets and glaciers in Stokes models is numerically ill-posed when the glacier rapidly departs from hydrostatic equilibrium. This manifests in velocity solutions that diverge with decreasing time step size, contaminating diagnostic strain rate and stress fields. This can be especially problematic for models of calving glaciers, where rapid changes in geometry lead to configurations that depart from hydrostatic equilibrium and accurate measures of the stress field are needed. Here we show that the singular behavior can be cured with minimal computational cost by reintroducing a regularization that corresponds to the acceleration term in the stress balance. This regularization provides numerically stable velocity solutions for all time step sizes.

Brandon Berg and Jeremy Bassis

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 17 Mar 2020)
Status: open (until 17 Mar 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Brandon Berg and Jeremy Bassis

Brandon Berg and Jeremy Bassis

Viewed

Total article views: 190 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
137 50 3 190 2 2
  • HTML: 137
  • PDF: 50
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 190
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 21 Jan 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 21 Jan 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 150 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 150 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 23 Feb 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Computer models of ice sheets and glaciers are often used as a component of sea level rise projections due to climate change. For models that seek to simulate the full balance of forces within the ice, if portions of the glacier are allowed to quickly break off in a process called iceberg calving, a numerical issue arises that can cause inaccurate results. We examine the issue and propose a solution so that future models can more accurately predict the future behavior of ice sheets and glaciers.
Computer models of ice sheets and glaciers are often used as a component of sea level rise...
Citation