Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.524 IF 4.524
  • IF 5-year value: 5.558 IF 5-year
    5.558
  • CiteScore value: 4.84 CiteScore
    4.84
  • SNIP value: 1.425 SNIP 1.425
  • SJR value: 3.034 SJR 3.034
  • IPP value: 4.65 IPP 4.65
  • h5-index value: 52 h5-index 52
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 55 Scimago H
    index 55
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2019-75
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2019-75
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 25 Apr 2019

Research article | 25 Apr 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal The Cryosphere (TC).

Contribution of calving to frontal ablation quantified from seismic and hydroacoustic observations calibrated with lidar volume measurements

Andreas Köhler1, Michał Pętlicki2, Pierre-Marie Lefeuvre1, Giuseppa Buscaino3, Christopher Nuth1, and Christian Weidle4 Andreas Köhler et al.
  • 1Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Post Box 1047, 0316 Oslo, Norway
  • 2Centro de Estudios Científicos, Valdivia, Chile
  • 3Institute for Coastal Marine Environment IAMC CNR
  • 4Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany

Abstract. Frontal ablation contributes significantly to the mass balance of tidewater glaciers in Svalbard and can be recovered with high temporal resolution using continuous seismic records. Determination of the relative contribution of dynamic ice loss through calving to frontal ablation requires precise estimates of calving volumes at the same temporal resolution. We combine seismic and hydroacoustic observations close to the calving front of Kronebreen, a marine terminating glacier in Svalbard, with repeat lidar scanning of the glacier front. Simultaneous time-lapse photography is used to assign volumes measured from lidar scans to seismically detected calving events. Empirical models derived from signal properties such as integrated amplitude are able to replicate volumes of individual calving events and cumulative subaerial ice loss over different lidar scan intervals from seismic and hydroacoustic data alone. This enables quantification of the contribution of calving to frontal ablation, which we estimate for Kronebreen to be about 18–30 %, slightly below the subaerially exposed area of the glacier front. We further develop a model calibrated for the permanent seismic station KBS at about 15 km distance from the glacier front, where 15–60 % of calving events can be detected under variable noise conditions due to reduced signal amplitudes at distance. Between 2007 and 2017, we find a 5–30 % contribution of calving ice blocks to frontal ablation which emphasizes the importance of underwater melting (roughly 150–350 m a−1). This study shows the feasibility to seismically monitor not only frontal ablation rates but also its dynamic ice loss contribution continuously and at high temporal resolution.

Andreas Köhler et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 25 Jun 2019)
Status: open (until 25 Jun 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Andreas Köhler et al.
Data sets

Glacier dynamic ice loss quantified through seismic eyes (CALVINGSEIS) – Dataset A. Köhler, C. Weidle, and C. Nuth https://doi.org/10.5880/GIPP.201604.1

Andreas Köhler et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 191 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
137 50 4 191 1 1
  • HTML: 137
  • PDF: 50
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 191
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 25 Apr 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 25 Apr 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 138 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 135 with geography defined and 3 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 22 May 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Ice loss at the front of glaciers can be observed with high temporal resolution using seismometers. We combine seismic and underwater sound measurements of iceberg calving at Kronebreen, a glacier in Svalbard, with laser scanning of the glacier front. We develop a method to determine calving ice loss directly from seismic and underwater calving signals. This allowed us to quantify the contribution of calving to the total ice loss at the glacier front which also includes underwater melting.
Ice loss at the front of glaciers can be observed with high temporal resolution using...
Citation