Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.790 IF 4.790
  • IF 5-year value: 5.921 IF 5-year
    5.921
  • CiteScore value: 5.27 CiteScore
    5.27
  • SNIP value: 1.551 SNIP 1.551
  • IPP value: 5.08 IPP 5.08
  • SJR value: 3.016 SJR 3.016
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 63 Scimago H
    index 63
  • h5-index value: 51 h5-index 51
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-31
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-31
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 11 Feb 2020

Submitted as: research article | 11 Feb 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

Present-day and future Greenland Ice Sheet precipitation frequency from satellite observations and an Earth System Model

Jan T. M. Lenaerts1,, M. Drew Camron1,, Christopher R. Wyburn-Powell1, and Jennifer E. Kay.1,2 Jan T. M. Lenaerts et al.
  • 1Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
  • 2CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
  • These authors have contributed equally to this work.

Abstract. The dominant mass input component of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is precipitation, whose amounts and phase are poorly constrained by observations. Here we use spaceborne radar observations from CloudSat to map the precipitation frequency and phase on the GrIS, and use those observations, in combination with a satellite simulator to enable direct comparison between observations and model, to evaluate present-day precipitation frequency in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The observations show that substantial variability of snowfall frequency over the GrIS exists, that snowfall occurs throughout the year, and snowfall frequency peaks in Spring and Fall. Rainfall is rare over the GrIS, and only occurs in regions under 2000 m elevation and to the peak summer season. Although CESM overestimates the rainfall frequency, it reproduces the spatial and seasonal variability of precipitation frequency reasonably well. Driven by a high-emission, worst-case RCP8.5 scenario, CESM indicates that rainfall frequency will increase considerably across the GrIS, and will occur at higher elevations, potentially exposing a much larger GrIS area to rain and associated meltwater refreezing, firn warming, and reduced storage capacity. This technique can be applied to evaluate precipitation frequency in other climate models, and can aid in planning future satellite campaigns.

Jan T. M. Lenaerts et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 07 Apr 2020)
Status: open (until 07 Apr 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Jan T. M. Lenaerts et al.

Jan T. M. Lenaerts et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 305 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
230 69 6 305 6 6
  • HTML: 230
  • PDF: 69
  • XML: 6
  • Total: 305
  • BibTeX: 6
  • EndNote: 6
Views and downloads (calculated since 11 Feb 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 11 Feb 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 155 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 155 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 05 Apr 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation